Program


In what sense? On what ground? For what/whom?

Meet the Galilean Jesus,”

Galilee School of Theology currently offers the following programs:
2 Master programs and 1 Doctoral Program

Master’s Degree Programs

The time frame for each Master’s degree class is four (4) hours per week, for a total of ten (10) weeks.  At the completion of forty class hours per course, 4 quarter units will be earned. Requirements of the completion of Master Programs are followings:

  1. Master of Divinity (M.Div): for Ordained Minister
           120 quarter units [108 class units + 12 units of internship]
  2. Master of Sacred Theology (STM): for Lay Leader
           72 units including Master’s thesis

 Doctoral Program

The time frame for  Doctoral degree class is four (4) hours per week, for a total of ten (10) weeks. After the completion of 40 class hours, 4 quarter units will be awarded. Requirements for the Doctoral programs are followings:

  1. Doctor of Sacred Theology (STD): for Christian Teacher
           96 Quarter units = 72 quarter units + Dissertation (24 quarter units)

 

1. MASTER OF DIVINITY (M.DIV)

The Master of Divinity Degree is a professional degree, which will equip graduates with the comprehensive graduate education necessary for becoming an ordained Minister. Upon successful completion of the program, graduates are expected to attain the following:

A competent professional skill in preaching the Bible, caring congregation, and leading worship as an ordained minister.

A healthy balance among the biblical, historical, theological, and practical areas of study essential for developing organizational, managerial, and counseling skills as an ordained minister.

A thorough knowledge and understanding of the traditions.

Exposure to contemporary theological issues with the goal of equipping students to think independently and constructively in areas vital to Christian ministry.

Degree Requirements

 ▪Successfully complete 120 quarter units of the following coursework with a minimum cumulative grade point average of 2.0 on a 4.0 scale:
Complete 72 quarter units of Common Core Courses, including Master’s Thesis of 4 units

17 Common Core Courses of 68 units are followings:

*5 Courses in Area I [Bible and Early Church]- 20 quarter units
*6 Courses in Area II [History and Theology]- 24 quarter units
*6 Courses in Area III [Practice of Faith in the Context]- 24 quarter units

And

* Master’s Thesis of 4 units
* Complete 12 quarter units of Internship (Required: 3 quarters of internship)
* Complete 36 quarter units of Elective Courses

* Time Limit

The Master of Divinity program must be completed within 4 years from the time the student commenced the first course, as a regular student, which applies to the degree requirements. This time limit may be extended due to special extenuating circumstances.

The Course Description of Master of Divinity

1) 5 Courses in Area I [Bible and Early Church] 

BE371 New Testament Greek I

Introduction to the grammar and vocabulary of the Greek New Testament. For students with no training in Greek. 

BE320 Prophets and the Prophetic Tradition

This course introduces the prophetic literature of the Old Testament/Hebrew Bible in relation to its ancient Near Eastern historical context. Attention is given to the historical contexts, literary history, and theological themes of this literature and its significance for the work of the church today. Seminar sessions designed to enable students to develop their exegetical and teaching skills complement lectures and assigned readings in which current biblical scholarship is presented.

BE340 The Book of Daniel and Apocalyptic Literature

Study and interpretation of representative examples of post-exilic prophecy and the movement from prophecy to apocalyptic in the book of Daniel. Exploring the nature of apocalyptic literature and its development after Israel’s exile, with a focus on theological theme and contemporary issues concerning the future of the Church and the world.

BE370 New Testament Introduction

Content of the New Testament writing in its historical setting and special attention to its relevance today. Required of students who have not had satisfactory study in the New Testament. This course is a prerequisite for all subsequent New Testament courses. 

BE373* Pauline Christianity

Paul’s life, letters, and thoughts are considered historically and in their bearing upon Christian theology. 

2) 6 Courses in Area II [History and Theology]- 30 Units 

HT310 Theology I: History of Christian Theology

A survey of the major philosophers of the West whose thought has contributed to the development of Christian theology. One-hour study section is required. 

HT311 Introduction to Doing Christian Theology

Methodological survey course in ancient, medieval, and modern Christian thought. Basic introduction course covers key concepts in Christian theology. 

HT313 Systematic Theology I (Introduction to the CREDO)

Systematic theology attempts to articulate in a coherent way the church’s claims regarding the truth of the Gospel of Jesus Christ. We will examine the contexts, tasks, sources and norms of theology. We will also engage classic and contemporary teachings about the Triune God and the wondrous creation of a glorious Creator.

HT330 Jesus Renaissance and Church Renewal

This course examines the history of Europe from the late fourteenth to the early seventeenth century in prospective with the moral collapse of the contemporary Christianity. Through the course students will learn the importance of the critical spirit and Humanism of Jesus and Renaissance, which is precisely in serious demand to remand the decline of Christianity. 

HT382 Philosophy and Religious Language

Philosophical introduction to issues in understanding of Religious languages, with special attention to Personal-Theistic Christian language.

HT466 Postmodern Theologies

The course examines the implications of postmodern theories for the development of theology, specifically focusing on the nature of subjectivity and the transformation of moral philosophy and ethics engendered by postmodernism’s critical reevaluation of the relationship between the Self and the Other. 

3) 6 Courses in Area III [Practice of Faith in the Context]

PC307 Theology and Practice of Stewardship

Exploration of a biblical, theological, ethical and practical understanding of stewardship, with the development of a holistic stewardship program for congregational life. 

PC330 Theological Understanding of Worship

Corporate worship is analyzed in terms of love, faith, and hope. Preaching and sacramental and pastoral rites are placed in an ecclesiological and missiological context.

PC341 Prayer in the Christian Tradition.

This course invites careful attention to the practices of corporate and personal prayer within the believing community from Old Testament times to the present. Experience of prayer, class discussion, readings, and course assignments will assist us in our discovery of the formative and transformative nature of the relational dialogue God enters into with us, and we with God.

PC367 Church Leadership, Administration and Finance

This is a basic course in understanding the nature of leadership and especially the nature of leadership within the context of a church community. A special focus will be place upon the function of leadership in the process of creating substantive and meaningful transformation in parish systems and in the lives of parishioners. Intentional reflection on leadership issues and images which are found in the Holy Scriptures and their applicability to present-day experience is a regular part of the course design. The course will strike a balance between the theoretical understanding of leadership theories and models and their practical application in a congregational setting.

PC370 Basics of Pastoral Care and Counseling

Basic principles and skills of pastoral counseling and their application to pastoral situations including informal, crisis, grief, referral, marriage/family, ethical and spiritual issues. 

PC381 Education and Formation in the Church

Changing perspectives of education and the life of the church. Special attention to the contemporary context and the congregational unit. 

 

2. MASTER OF SACRED THEOLOGY (STM)

The Master of Sacred Theology Degree is an academic degree, which will equip graduates with the comprehensive graduate education necessary for advanced studies. Upon successful completion of the program, graduates are expected to attain the following:

Deep understanding of Christian traditions for enlightened understanding of oneself.

Exposure to contemporary theological issues with the goal of equipping students to think independently and constructively in all areas is vital to Christian social life and lay ministry.

Degree Requirements

 ▪ Successfully complete 72 quarter units of the following coursework with a minimum cumulative grade point average of 2.0 on a 4.0 scale:

 9 Common Core Courses of 36 units are followings:

*3 Courses in Area I [Bible and Early Church]-12 quarter units             
*4
Courses in Area II [History and Theology]-16 quarter units
*2 Courses in Area III [Practice of Faith in the Context]-8 quarter units

And

* Complete 4 quarter units of Master’s Thesis
* Complete 32 quarter units of Elective Courses [Student may take a 4 unit Internship as “religious Leadership training” with Dean’s permission.]

* Time Limit

The Master of Sacred Theology program must be completed within 3 years from the time the student commenced the first course, as a regular student, which applies to the degree requirements. This time limit may be extended due to special extenuating circumstances.

The Course Description of Master of Sacred Theology 

1) 3 Courses in Area I [Bible and Early Church]

BE320 Prophets and the Prophetic Tradition

This course introduces the prophetic literature of the Old Testament/Hebrew Bible in relation to its ancient Near Eastern historical context. Attention is given to the historical contexts, literary history, and theological themes of this literature and its significance for the work of the church today. Seminar sessions designed to enable students to develop their exegetical and teaching skills complement lectures and assigned readings in which current biblical scholarship is presented.

BE472 The Gospel of Mark

English exegesis of the gospel according to Mark.

BE373* Pauline Christianity

Paul’s life, letters, and thoughts are considered historically and in their bearing upon Christian theology. 

2) 4 Courses in Area II [History and Theology]

HT311 Introduction to Doing Christian Theology

Methodological survey course in ancient, medieval, and modern Christian thought. Basic introduction course covers key concepts in Christian theology. 

HT313 Systematic Theology I (Introduction to the CREDO)

Systematic theology attempts to articulate in a coherent way the church’s claims regarding the truth of the Gospel of Jesus Christ. We will examine the contexts, tasks, sources and norms of theology. We will also engage classic and contemporary teachings about the Triune God and the wondrous creation of a glorious Creator. 

HT382 Philosophy and Religious Language

Philosophical introduction to issues in understanding of Religious languages, with special attention to Personal-Theistic Christian language. 

HT466 Postmodern Theologies

The course examines the implications of postmodern theories for the development of theology, specifically focusing on the nature of subjectivity and the transformation of moral philosophy and ethics engendered by postmodernism’s critical reevaluation of the relationship between the Self and the Other.

3) 2 Courses in Area III [Practice of Faith in the Context]

PC340 Moral Theology

Situates the moral life and contemporary issues within the Christian theological tradition. As a capstone for the core curriculum, requires interdisciplinary work, particularly in relation to each student’s major and/or prospective career.

PC382 Foundations of Christian Education

Helps to develop a practical theology of religious education. Focuses on the theological foundations of faith education, including an understanding of the spiritual formation of children and adults. Students also study specific strategies for catechesis including planning, teaching methods, catechetical formation. 

 

3. DOCTOR OF SACRED THEOLOGY (STD) 

The Doctor of Sacred Theology Degree is an academic degree with end-user friendly mind, which will equip graduates with the comprehensive graduate education necessary to serve the church as teacher. Upon successful completion of the program, graduates are expected to attain the following:

▪A comprehensive understanding of the Bible, Christian traditions and contemporary spiritual situations;
▪A professional skill in communicating various religious visions

Degree Requirements

▪ Successfully complete 96 quarter units of the following coursework with a minimum cumulative grade point average of 2.0 on a 4.0 scale:

Complete 72 quarter units of courses
Complete 24 quarter units of dissertation

▪4 Common Core Courses of 16 units are followings:

1 Course in Area I [Bible and Early Church]

BE674* Bible and Preaching 

1 Course in Area II [History and Theology]

HT601* Critical Review of the Christian Ideas of Salvation 

1 Course in Area III [Practice of Faith in the Context]

PC601* Doing Theology in the Ministerial Context

1 Course for Dissertation Preparation

HT630 Directed Studies

* Complete 56 quarter units of Elective Courses
* Complete 24 quarter units of Dissertation

* Time Limit

The Doctor of Theology program must be completed within 4 years from the time a student begins the first course, as a regular student, and applies for the degree requirements. This time limit may be extended due to special extenuating circumstances.

The Course Description of Doctor of Sacred Theology

1) 1 Course in Area I [Bible and Early Church] 

BE 674  Bible and Preaching

An interdisciplinary “exegesis for preaching” course team-taught by faculty from both Bible and Theology departments. This course helps students move from exegetical work to the sermon, attending to preaching that continues both the substance of the biblical text and its form and function. 

2) 1 Course in Area II [History and Theology]

HT 601 Critical Review of the Christian Ideas of Salvation  (8 Units)

An interactive survey of basic ideas of Atonement and Eschaton with particular attention to seeker’s value. 

3) 1 Course in Area III [Practice of Faith in the Context]

PC 601 Doing Theology in the Ministerial Context

This course teaches to do one’s own theology in relating the Christian traditions to one’s own ministerial context. What are the issues of my people? How do they struggle with them? What could the Gospel help them? In the class all participants will tackle together these questions.

4) 1 Course for Dissertation Preparation 

HT630 Directed Studies

Student writes a major paper on the topic chosen by the student in consultation with the instructor. Required of all Doctoral students and designed to prepare for the dissertation.